Spirituality & Energetics

WHO WE ARE

OUR STANDARDS

WHY CHOOSE US

This element represents the description field. You can edit text on your website by double clicking on a text box on your website. Alternatively, when you select a text box a settings menu will appear. Selecting ‘Edit Text’ from this menu will also allow you to edit the text within this text box.
This element represents the description field. You can edit text on your website by double clicking on a text box on your website. Alternatively, when you select a text box a settings menu will appear. Selecting ‘Edit Text’ from this menu will also allow you to edit the text within this text box.
This element represents the description field. You can edit text on your website by double clicking on a text box on your website. Alternatively, when you select a text box a settings menu will appear. Selecting ‘Edit Text’ from this menu will also allow you to edit the text within this text box.
The Yoga Sutras outline a plan for living that flows from action to knowledge to liberation. This plan, or path, has eight limbs, which work more like spokes on a wheel than like steps on a ladder. The first four limbs are the limbs of tapas, or spirituality in action. Included here are the yamas and the niyamas, or the five moral restraints and five observances of yoga. The yamas and niyamas are akin to the Ten Commandments and are the true foundation of the yoga student's life.
The next two limbs of tapas are asana and pranayama, the postures and yogic breathing. The yamas and niyamas, asana and pranayama all combine to form our path of action as we deepen our practice. They are actions taken or not taken with our bodies. The yamas and niyamas bring us into right relationship with ourselves, others, and the spirit of the universe. The asana refine our bodies, deepen our awareness of the senses, and enhance our powers of concentration. In pranayama we develop control over the flow of our breath, thereby entering into a dance with our life enemy. These four practices refresh the body, refine the mind, and bring peace to the heart, allowing us to meet the pressures of life with equanimity.
The next two limbs of the eight-limb path are called swadhyaya, or self-study. They are pratyahara and dharana. Pratyahara literally means turning inward — the mind withdraws from the senses of perception. In the stillness of pratyahara, dharana — or concentration — can be developed. The light of our awareness can begin to shine on our soul. The deepest form of connectedness is now possible.
Dhyana and samadhi form the final spokes of the wheel and comprise the limbs of isvara, the final frontier — the surrender of the individual self to the universal self. Dhyana is meditation, and samadhi is union with the object of meditation — the state in which meditation is no longer necessary, in which we re-experience our primal oneness, we come home.
The eight limbs are a map, but in yoga as in life, the journey is more important than the destination. In Alcoholics Anonymous they say that we must be willing to grow along spiritual lines. And that is really all that is necessary — as we undertake a yoga practice. We must simply remain open to our own spiritual potential and be willing to take action on our own behalf. As the days go by, we will examine each aspect of the eight-limb path in turn. Together we will experience the great adventure, the only adventure, the journey from darkness into light.